Eumorpha obliquus obliquus
Updated as per AN ANNOTATED CHECKLIST OF THE SPHINGIDAE OF BOLIVIA, October 2007
Updated as per http://biological-diversity.info/sphingidae.htm (Belize), November 2007
Updated as per Fauna Entomologica De Nicarauga, November 2007
Updated as per The Known Sphingidae of Costa Rica, November 2007
Updated as per personal communication with Jose Monzon (Guatemala); May 2009
Updated as per CATE (description; Mexico, Paraguay, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru); February 13, 2011
Updated as per personal communication with Jose Ramon Alvarez Corral (Barinas, Venezuela) May 28, 2012; ongoing

Eumorpha obliquus obliquus
you-MOR-fuhmah-BLEE-kue-uhs
(Rothschild & Jordan, 1903) Pholus

Eumorpha obliquus obliquus female, Costa Rica, courtesy of Dan Janzen.

This site has been created by Bill Oehlke at oehlkew@islandtelecom.com
Comments, suggestions and/or additional information are welcomed by Bill.

TAXONOMY:

Superfamily: Sphingoidea, Dyar, 1902
Family: Sphingidae, Latreille, 1802
Subfamily: Macroglossinae, Harris, 1839
Tribe: Philampelini, Burmeister
Genus: Eumorpha, Hubner, [1807]
Species: obliquus obliquus, (Rothschild & Jordan, 1903)

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DISTRIBUTION:

Eumorpha obliquus obliquus (wingspan 130-136 mm) flies in
Bolivia: La Paz (700-1800m, November); and probably throughout most of Central and South America:
Venezuela: (Barinas (JRAC));
French Guiana: Kaw;
Ecuador;
Peru;
Paraguay;
Brazil, replaced in southeastern Brazil by Eumorpha obliquus orientis;
Mexico (Cate);
Belize: Cayo, Toledo;
Guatemala (JM);
Nicaragua: Jinotega, Granada, Rio San Juan;
Costa Rica: Guanacaste, Puntarenas, Alajuela, Cartago, Limon, Heredia, San Jose.

I suspect it also flies in Panama, Colombia, Guyana and Suriname, but I have no confirmed reports as yet.

Most similar to Eumorpha anchemolus but forewing shorter, broader, with an even outer margin; forewing upperside a strong contrast between the generally light basal half and the generally dark apical half; abdomen lacking a clearly defined dorsal stripe. Generally darker than Eumorpha obliquus guadelupensis and Eumorpha obliquus orientis; underside of body yellowish, as in Eumorpha obliquus orientis (southeastern Brazil), rather than rosy as in Eumorpha obliquus guadelupensis (Guadelupe).

Labial palp segment 1 with white spot narrower and longer than in Eumorpha anchemolus. Conspicuous white line behind eye.

Underside of body and wings yellowish. Foretibia with outer surface grey.

Forewing upperside more glossy grey than in Eumorpha anchemolus; three oblique parallel lines present in basal area running straight from costal margin to CuP fold; discal spot absent; oblique shadowy band broad extending to outer margin, where it is broader than in Eumorpha anchemolus; subapical costal patch large; dark patch near tornus broader than in similar species of Eumorpha, rounded triangular, not concave distally, extending anterior to CuA2, but here not narrowed; fringe of posterior margin buff, less extensive than Eumorpha anchemolus.

FLIGHT TIMES AND PREFERRED FOOD PLANTS:

Eumorpha obliquus obliquus adults are on the wing every month of the year in Costa Rica.

Eumorpha obliquus obliquus larvae feed upon grape species.

Eumorpha obliquus French Guiana, courtesy of Stephane Vassel,
id by Jean-Marie Cadiou and Jean Haxaire.

ECLOSION, SCENTING AND MATING:

Pupae wiggle to surface just prior to eclosion. Females call at night, and males (below) fly into the wind to pick up and track the pheromone plume.

Eumorpha obliquus obliquus male courtesy of Dan Janzen.

EGGS, LARVAE AND PUPAE:

Larval Food Plants


Listed below are primary food plant(s) and alternate food plants. It is hoped that this alphabetical listing followed by the common name of the foodplant will prove useful. The list is not exhaustive. Experimenting with closely related foodplants is worthwhile.

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